Home Journals Lymphatic Dysfunction as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Lymphatic Dysfunction as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Credits to the Source Link Jain Jeong, Yasuko Iwakiri
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The primary function of the lymphatic system in the liver is to collect interstitial fluid (lymph) and drain it to lymph nodes through lymphatic capillaries, ultimately returning it to the systemic circulation. Lymphatic capillaries consist of one layer of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) with unique button-like junctions allowing proteins, lipoproteins, and immune cells in interstitial fluid to be taken in. Alterations in these functionally specialized LEC junctions may impair LEC permeability and drainage functions, contributing to disease pathogenesis. In liver diseases, the number of hepatic lymphatic vessels generally increases. However, questions remain as to how increased lymphatic vessels are related to liver pathology and whether the function of LECs is altered in liver diseases. Despite its apparent importance, the hepatic lymphatic system has not been adequately studied.

In a study published in the current issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Burchill et al

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  • Burchill M.A.
  • Finlon J.M.
  • Goldberg A.R.
  • et al.
Oxidized low-density lipoprotein drives dysfunction of the liver lymphatic system.